When I was 20(ish).

Around 1991.

My first business turned over £36,000.

And the two of us that ran it took home about £2,400 a year each.

When I was 23 I joined the McDonald’s graduate programme on £13,000.

When I was 25 I joined Project North East on about £18,000 as a trainer and business consultant.

When I was 27 I set up Building up Business, a business support programme in the North East of England, and I was paid £25,000.

When I was 27 I worked at Universities in the evening too, earning an additional £5,000.

When I was 29 I worked for Sunderland University and was paid £40,000.

When I was 30 I ran a new business and was paid £0 for 2 years.

When I was 32 I was running my own businesses and was paid £6,000 a year.

When I was 34 I was running my own business and was paid £20,000 a year.

When I was 36 I was running my own business and was paid £50,000 a year.

When I was 37 I was running my own business and was paid £80,000 a year.

When I was 38 (it was 2008) I was running my own business and was paid £20,000 a year.

When I was 39 I was running my own business and was paid £40,000 a year.

When I was 39 a client bumped me for £26,000.

When I was 40 I was running my own business and was paid around £100,000 a year.

When I was 40 I sold shares in one business for £26,000.

When I was 42 I was running my own business and was paid around £80,000 a year.

When I was 45 I closed most of my businesses and was paid £25,000 a year.

When I was 47 I was learning a new way of working and running businesses and was paid £10,000 a year.

When I was 47 I invested over £50,000 in building the Always Wear Red brand.

When I was 49 I was starting to work out what’s what and was paid around £20,000 a year.

When I was 50 I was stabilising my new world and I was paid around £40,000 a year.

Now I am 51 I am further stabilising my new world and I am being paid quite well.

I am balancing the figure I am on now with how happy I am.

I am thinking about with what it is that I am doing to earn it.

But I do like thinking about this.

Because more than anything.

I want to be happy.

Rich Man. Poor Man. 

The happiest times in my life.

So – in other words – the times that I was richest were:

  1. When I built my first business.
    (I was earning £2,400 a year).
  2. When I was 34 and felt that my businesses were working.
    (I was earning £20,000 a year).
  3. When I was 47 and building something new.
    (I was earning £10,000 a year).
  4. Potentially now. (But I have to be careful because I am a bit confused about how to spend my time at the moment. I have to make sure that I am working with people that allow me to do my best work. This is important to me. Because it is the only way that I can be important to them).

What next?

I am not sure exactly what to do next.

Some things will stay the same.

Some will change.

But I do know that I want to be happy.

So I am going to (largely) ignore the money.

And work out the best way to be rich, instead.

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